Agreement In Speech

In standard English, for example, you can say I am or it is, but not “I am” or “it is.” This is because the grammar of the language requires that the verb and its subject coincide personally. The pronouns I and him are respectively the first and third person, just as the verbs are and are. The verbage form must be chosen in such a way as to have the same person as the subject, unlike the fictitious agreement based on meaning. [2] [3] In American English, for example, the expression of the United Nations is treated as singular for the purposes of concordance, although it is formally plural. A rare type of arrangement that phonologically copies parts of the head instead of agreeing with a grammatical category. [4] For example, in Bainouk: Accord Noun-Pronoun: number and genre orientation Also note the agreement that is revealed even in the subjunctive spirit. If you are referring to general groups or names, you should pay attention to the number and gender agreement. There is also unanimity in the number. For example: Vitabu viwili vitatosha (Two books will suffice), Michungwa miwili itatosha (Two orange trees will suffice), Machungwa mawili yatatosha (Two oranges will suffice). There is also a consensus between pronouns and precursors. Examples of this can be found in English (although English pronouns mainly follow natural sex and not grammatical sex): in Hungarian, verbs have a multipersonal concordance, which means that they correspond to more than one of the words of the verb: not only its subject, but also its object (precision). There is a difference between the case where a particular object is present and the case where the object is indeterminate or if there is no object at all.

(Adverbs have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I love someone or something indeterminate), szeretem (I love him, she, or her, or her, specifically), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, me, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, her or her especially). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is agreement between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often refers more or less precisely to the person). The word “agreement,” if one refers to a grammatical rule, means that the words used by an author must be aligned with number and sex (if any).

Comments

comments